Hiking the Inca Trail

February 2, 2011 at 12:18 pm | Posted in Cuzco, Mountains, Peru, Travel | 1 Comment
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Everyone says go to Machu Picchu in June and July. When it is dry. And warm. But for me, I say that is ridiculous, and both times I have visited Machu Picchu have been in the final weeks of January at the height of the rainy season.  This second visit included hiking the Inca Trail with my parents who were visiting Cusco for the week.  Results> fog, rain, rock solid calves, and a sense of accomplishment.

The Inca Trail is 42 km of work. Although there are numerous porters carrying your tents, food, and everything to make backpacking seem less like actually backpacking, you still carry your sleeping bags, mats, and clothes.  After months of research (and searching), I settled on going with Cusco Explorers for $250 which is… the upside to hiking it in the rainy season.  Less tourists, less money.

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The first day is a 11km walk up the valley over a relativity flat trail. The second day is where it gets intense. You start at 2900m and go over a pass at 4200m (dead woman’s pass) before dropping down to 3800m over 12km.  The result? Coming into camp with my legs violently shaking.  The third day is longer, 16km, with stops to some ruins along the way before getting into a campsite 6km away from Machu Picchu complete with hot showers and a restaurant.  This doesn’t feel like backpacking.

Unfortunately, there had been a landslide on the last leg of the trail, so we had to hike down to Aguas Calientes and arrive to Machu Picchu (not via the Sun Gate) wet, tired, happy, accomplished.

As our guide said, the trail is challenging, unforgettable, and eunich (wait thats not right, he meant unique). The experience of a lifetime and the chance to check yet another thing off my bucket list.

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In Transit

January 24, 2011 at 10:13 am | Posted in Kiva, Microfinance, Mountains, Peru, Travel | Leave a comment
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Sometimes it feels like my life is in transit. I wonder in those moments if life is a sum of the places you are waiting to go, or if the key to life is enjoying the journey and the mundane, endless hours in the terminals of… wherever.

And as it turns out… It is. If you don’t enjoy the process of getting there, you will miss out on those perfect sunsets, the people you met along the way, and when you get to your destination, you will only be thinking about how much you hated getting there.

All of these thoughts are summed up in my latest trip down south to do a borrower verification with our field partner, Manuela Ramos.  It started out last weekend when I took a trip to Arequipa to see American movies (yes they have a theater), to see Mt. Misti rising up from the town, and to read in the shade of every park I could find.  From there, I took another bus to Puno passing the high mountains and flamingos and deserts and lakes.

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In the first two days in Puno, I had traveled all over Juliaca and beyond, and down to the Bolivian border near Yunguyo.  Which added up to waking up before sunrise, and getting back hours after the sunset over Lake Titicaca.  Unfortunately, one very elusive borrower had taken off to Moquegua (another part of Peru). And if I couldn’t find her, I had to visit another 10 new borrowers.  With parents arriving on Monday, I choose (reluctantly and not enjoying the journey) the 7 hour trip for a 15 minute interview.

I was back in the morning, and headed out to the spectacular islands on Lake Titicaca. First to the famous floating islands Los Uros which I visited three years before, and then to spend a night on Amantani and a morning on Taquile.  I ended my stay with a cannonball in the freezing cold lake (did I mention that the lake is 3810m high??).

70 plus hours on buses, trucks, vans, boats. Exhausted. But happy. Remembering that traveling, meeting people, the journey, is why I did this in the first place.

Starting the New Year with a Bang

January 10, 2011 at 3:58 pm | Posted in Cuzco, Mountains, Peru, Travel | Leave a comment
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Well, my New Year´s Resolution to one-up 2010 has been going well so far.  I spent the second doing downhill mountain biking in Picol, near San Jeronimo, Cusco.  We took a cab 800m up to the mountain and flew down steep trails on bikes.  My ride was going fantasically until my brake started sticking… The result being this:

This past weekend, I settled on trying to sneak into Sacsayhuaman and White Water Rafting.  Not to bad eh? I spent Saturday morning walking around the small villages surrounding Sacsayhuaman and climbing rocks until I got into the main section of these spectacular ruins.

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Then yesterday, we headed up to Huambutio to go white water rafting on a III+ river with a coworker´s husband.  After two hours on the river / rapids, I was exhausted from paddling, but more excited to do it again on a IV river the next time!

Cuzco Ruins Travel Guide

December 23, 2010 at 6:03 pm | Posted in Culture, Cuzco, Mountains, Peru, Travel | 1 Comment
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This is the best information you are going to get on the ruins around Cuzco.  Which ones you can get in for free, which ones are the best.  Here, I´m evaluating Tipón, Pikillacta, Moray, Chinchero, and Q´enqo.

So, this past week Marc Capule came to visit.  Being a shoestring traveler like myself with a strong adversion to paying the gringo tax that Cuzco imposes, we decided to try to get into as many ruins as we could for free.  To prove my point, we walked into a bookstore to find him a notebook, and when the lady behind the counter said 80; he assumed it was 80 soles ($40) and said, “Ok, I don´t need it that badly” and started to leave. Soon everything got sorted out (the notebook was 80 cents), and we started a week of awesome food (will be in a following post) and touring around Cuzco.

 

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Tipón is my favorite ruin so far.  To get there, take a cab to the Urcos taxi stop on Av. La Cultura in front of the Universidad.  Get off at Tipón.  Cabs cost S./10 a person and another S./10 to get in.  Alternatively, walk down the road 4 km.  When you get to the base of the hill, don´t go up the pedestrian steps, but walk up the road past the giant Tipón sign.  About 20m up the road, there is a small path leading up the ancient Incan steps to the ruins (and bypassing the control).  Tipón is a beautiful series of terraces interspersed with canals.  You can walk up the Incan steps in the wall (generally rocks sticking out of the wall) to climb the terraces to the natural spring at the back of the ruins. Or alternatively, check out the view from the fortess that you passed coming up the Incan steps.

Pikillacta. Similarly to get here, you take the taxi from the Urcos stop, and get off at Pikillacta.  The only cool part of the ruin is the giant wall alongside the road and views of the lake. (see slideshow). Sneaking in to the main ruin is easy.  From the road, take “the high road” instead of walking down the path to control.  The path leads you past control directly to the ancient city.  Now, merely crumbling rock walls. Place this at the bottom of your list.

Moray. I thought (and had been told) this was one of the closest ruins in the Sacred Valley.  My verdict, go to Tipón first.  It´s better maintained, greener, and with the natural spring, more beautiful. To get here, take the bus to Urubamba from Pavitos street in Cuzco.  Get off Moray.  Your options of getting to the ruin are limited (they are 14km away).  The cab runs S./15 each way.  Alternatively, you can do a bike ride to the ruins.  The circular terraces were used for crop rotation (each terrace differed by .5º C so they were experimenting with temperature differences) and the larger one as an amphitheater.  The cab will drop you off at the control, but a dirt path leading down to Urubamba suggests that you could sneak in from the valley.  There is a nice hike from Las Salineras to Urubamba (another S./15 to get there).

Chinchero. Second favorite ruin in this list. Take the bus/ convey/ taxi from Pavitos street in Cuzco.  Get off at Chinchero.  From the big sign that talks about the ruins, walk up until you see the plaza on your left. Walk through the plaza, and take the street up that is closest to Urubamba (away from Cuzco).  Although there are three controls in the city, going up the left hand side (if you are facing the ruins) lets you avoid all three.  The ruins, the church, and the market are all worth checking out.

Finally, Q´enqo. These ruins are a short trip from Cuzco and a lovely afternoon hike.  Walk up through San Blas until you hit the road going to Sacsayhuaman.  On the road should be a small sign for rock climbing.  If you cross the small creek and follow the path up, you reach the Moon Temple (when you get there, make sure you go into the caves).  For Q´enqo climb the hills on the other side of the creek until you pass a massive Inca stone wall. You can reach Q´enqo from the backside by crossing the bridge.

Happy Travels! Cuzco Restaurant and the Rest of the Sacred Valley Ruins Soon!

Guatemala Rundown (1)

October 27, 2010 at 2:55 pm | Posted in Aldea Nimasac, Antigua, Culture, El Salvador, Guatemala, Lago Atitlan, Mountains, Travel | 1 Comment
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So, in exactly 8 dias, my feet will touch U.S. soil once again.  Now, this usually isn´t a feeling I have when I´m traveling, but I´m ready to go home.  It´s not that I haven´t enjoyed Guatemala; it´s just that i´m ready to move on to the next adventure.  I have basically finished my Kiva workplan for FAPE (at the start of the fellowship 770 hours of work), and am (minus a couple of field visits) just bidding my time.

But before I go, I wanted to post a short series (and will help keep me busy) about Guatemala: my favorite and least favorite parts and what I have learned about life and microfinance.

Lago Atitlan. For anyone that has visited Guatemala, they would list this as a highlight.  Six years ago, I came to Guatemala on a high school trip building a school and besides the sacrificed goat on the steps of a church in Chichicastenago, the iconic image of three volcanos shrouded in clouds was forever burned in my memory.  And thankfully so, the film from six years ago was ruined and my camera this time was stolen before I could back up the pictures.  Particularly jumping into the pristine water from the cliffs in San Marcos and eating the fresh burritos and drinking coffee from a nameless café on the waterfront will inevitably be some of the highlights of my trip.

Antigua. Is it too touristy to say this? The pristine colonial city nestled in the mountains just minutes from Guatemala City was my refugee multiple times from the city.  There are more extranjeros in a 10 block radius here than the rest of Guatemala (ok, I made that up, but its true), and more cafés than natives, but the presence of an additional police force keeps the streets clean and I can´t think of a better place in the world to spend an afternoon drinking a coffee on the patio of a café overlooking its cobblestone streets.

Totonicapán. Or the Xela and the surrounding mountains. The only place you can get a real taste of Guatemala.  Small towns, beautiful churches, comedores serving a hot caldo de res (soup) on a cold day, and untouched mountains.  Where corn is more popular than McDonalds (and more prolific: think corn tamales, tortillas, atoll (corn drink), corn liquor, and whatever else you can dream of) and where hospitality is a way of life.  My two weeks living in a small village in Aldea Nimasac and being the first gringo that most of the kids had ever seen was unparalleled.

My reason to return to Guatemala: Tikal, the Mayan ruins in the Peten district to the northeast. Yesterday, someone asked me my favorite parts of Central America, I replied that lets take the food, culture, Lago Atitlan, Antigua, and combine them with the beaches in El Salvador.  Ideal.

Some Time Off

September 20, 2010 at 11:06 pm | Posted in Beach, Mountains, Nicaragua, Surfing, Travel | 7 Comments
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Read this is you are interested in the three entirely separate stories from my Nicaraguan vacation with fellow kiva fellows (Yes, the repetition was necessary). Read this if you read my other post about climbing volcanos and you were wondering… hmm I wonder if Eric will do that again. Or if you like surfing, getting ripped off, fresh water sharks or wandering through the jungle at night

Guatemala City – San Salvador – Honduras – Managua – Laguna de Apoyo – Grenada – Isla Omotepe – San Juan Del Sur — Guatemala

Story 1: We roll off the boat at 6:30pm en Isla Omotepe, Nicaragua.  For the past hour on the boat, a guy has been following us around asking if we want a ride to our destination, Playa Santo Domingo for $4 a piece.  This might strike everyone in the States as a deal, but after you are used to paying half that for a couple of months, you become more price sensitive.

We opted to wait until we got off the boat to search for a ride. Where there is a gringo, there is 10 natives offering them a wide variety of both needed and unneeded items.  It was dark when we got offer, and immediately we got bids from 3 Nicas to take us (our group of 5 plus 3 german girls) to Playa Santo Domingo for around $2 apiece. We accepted the order and jumped in the back of a large pick-up with railings to hold onto, banana leaves, empty watermelon rinds and an army of spiders and mosquitos to keep us company.

Half-a-kilometer later, we hear a telltale clunk, clunk, clunk as entire our tire is rolling off the car or the axle was breaking. We wait and try to catch a ride with the other transports going into town (the ones we had earlier denied to take our cheaper banana truck) without luck. And then, we started to walk the 2 k through the pitch black jungle to the nearest town.  Finally, a small truck pulls up and offers us rides for $5 a piece–outrageous since we were already to Altagracia, just not to the Playa Santo Domingo. Within minutes of picking us up, our banana truck races past making us believe that it was one giant trick.

We argued with the lady who told us she needed to charge $45 for the 15 minute ride in the back of the truck because of taxes. To which I replied we should be getting a receipt if you are paying taxes.  In the end, we forgot the whole thing over dinner and drinks at a nearby restaurant with Harold our new Nica friend.

Story 2: Climbing the “Vulc” Concepcion.  It´s something about Central America where I have to climb a volcano every couple of weeks.  This time it was Concepcion: soaring 1610m  into the sky (for all the estadounidenes) we are talking about pushing a 5000ft elevation gain.  Our guide seemed to think it was no problem, so we packed our jar of peanut butter, some bread, 3 liters of water a piece, and some granola bars are were on our way.

Unfortunately (and this should have spelled trouble for the rest of the day), we were unable to catch a ride to the trailhead so waking up at 5:30am to get an early start was almost pointless as we walked 7km to the trailhead.  Then, we followed a path straight up to the top. On most trails that ride 5000ft in elevation, there are some form of switchbacks, but in Nicaragua they decided it would be a lot more fun without them. And because of the conical shape of the volcano every step got a bit steeper.

Drenched in sweat, we finally made it to the top, and amidst the sulfur fumes, our guide proceeds to tell us how lucky we are that the Civil Guard isn´t here to tell us not to get close to the crater because every once in a while the edge of this very active volcano collapses in on itself.  I was beyond tired and thirsy, but with the fumes and superheated rocks (and imminent danger of death) there was no rest at the top.

After a full 12 hours of hiking, we made it back down into town and I drank the most delicious coke I have ever tasted followed by 2 liters of water. We caught two rides back (the first ride, one of the guys gave us shots of corn liquor and then proceeded to try to steal my hat) and collapsed into bed early.

Story 3: Not really a story, but from Omotepe, we headed to the beach at San Juan del Sur. The second day we were there, I finally got to go surfing at Remanso Beach about 30 minutes away. We rolled up from the hostel with 15 gringos with boards (all of which didn´t know how to surf) and took the rip current out to the main 6-8ft break. Me, a nine foot longboard, and an empty break. Heaven on earth.

Now after 24 + hours of traveling I´m back in Guate City, but will always remember one of the greatest vacations I have ever taken…

Where I´ve Been (Not a Facebook App)

September 8, 2010 at 8:09 pm | Posted in Aldea Nimasac, Cuzco, Guatemala City, Kiva, Mountains, Nicaragua, Peru, Travel | 1 Comment

Read this if you are wondering where I am. Where I am going (both soon and not so soon). Read if you have seen Guatemala in the news lately or if you were wondering what the life of a Kiva Fellow is like.

First of all, Happy Birthday Mom! Secondly, I have been way too many places in the last couple of days, and it looks like my journey is just starting….

I had to leave Aldea Nimasac. I had to get back to the capital. For one, I had basically completed my work there (with the Cerise 98% done and finishing my Borrower Verifications on Friday).  And secondly, I had a summons to present myself at the police station regarding the report that was filed (of my robbery). I was stoked at first about the prospects that they caught the guy and I would be getting my stuff back, but as it turns out, they only wanted to expand the report that was filed.

First, a recap of my time in the Aldea:

But I had to leave. Unfortunately over the weekend, it rained. Hard. It was plastered all over the news, and I didn´t realize how bad it really was until I received a phone call from my Dad asking if I was still breathing. Living in a village really disconnects you from the world around you (so much so that my Dad a thousand miles away knew more about what was happening than me 30km from the action).  Determined to get back, I convinced the driver at ASDIR: intentamos por lo menos (let´s try at least).  We tried two routes that were both blocked by landslides and finally came across one that went from Totonicapán to Quiche to Chichicastenago back to the road we wanted to be on at Los Encuentros.  After an 8 hour trip (that should have taken 3 hours) I was back in the capital…

On a completely different note: I got accepted to the following Kiva fellowship in Cuzco, Peru (so if you want to go to Machu Piccu there has never been a better time than coming to visit me!).  I will be working with a microfinance institution there called Asociación Arariwa.

And this Saturday, I am leaving on a 17 hour bus ride to Managua, Nica to meet up with some Kiva fellows for a vacation to Ometepe and San Juan del Sur!

As a closing thought, remember the words of John Steinbeck in Grapes of Wrath “How can you hope for heaven if your life ain´t lived?” And Viví.

50 Hour Weeks and Climbing Peaks

September 1, 2010 at 9:26 am | Posted in Aldea Nimasac, Guatemala, Kiva, Microfinance, Mountains, Travel | 1 Comment
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Read this is you are really bored or if you care about me and about what is going on in my life. Contents: rainy days, movies, books, working Saturdays and climbing everything in sight. And a video of the valley I´m posted up in.

So, I only have two weeks here. Which means I have a lot to get done. On my workplan I have implement the “Cerise Questionaire” and do Borrower Verifications. All of last week I spent in the office trying to convince people to talk to me about social performance in the ASDIR office. Essentially, Cerise is a social performance metric that quantifies how microfinance institutions measure up against their own goals and mission.  This data can be used by funding institutions, can be used to benchmark their progress in the future in the field of social responsibility, and is a standardized measurement that can be used to benchmark microfinance institutions against others (a great tool considering the depth and breath of services that microfinance institutions can offer). Read here another fellow´s blog about the subject. So, I collect data and do interviews to fill out this 60 page questionaire.

My other job is doing borrower verifications. Basically, for a random group of ten borrowers, I check all the data surrounding their loan between Kiva´s system, the institutions MIS (read management information system), and the borrowers passbooks. It´s checks like these that allow Kiva to say with reasonable confidence that all the borrowers on the site are legitimate. So, there is my 50 hour week (even came in for a half-day Saturday!).

In my free time, I love Climbing Peaks around my house. If I don´t have access to sand, waves or the beach, I´d say that this is one of my favorite activities. Everyday after work, I change clothes, don my rain coat, pick an apple for the road and rise from 2500m to well over 3000m as I work my way out of the valley where Aldea Nimasac lies.  I drag myself up and slide down.  All for that great view at the end of the climb. Of sweeping fields, pine forests, and not one house in sight.

I come back as the sun is setting (although I never get to see it because of the cloud cover), and settle into the hammock with a good book or movie. And wait for Andreas to get back from work so we can chow down on his wife´s delicious cooking. Read: fresh tamales, tortillas, and platos típicos everyday. I know its a lot of work (helped chop wood for two hours for the word-fired stove and hot-water heater), but I could get used to this lifestyle.  If only I could stay for longer.


Stop and Stare

August 30, 2010 at 5:59 pm | Posted in Aldea Nimasac, Guatemala, Mountains, Travel | 3 Comments
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Read this if you wonder what exactly makes my life a One Republic song, if you have ever been out of your element, if you love thrift store shopping or lived in a town with less than 10,000 people.  If you have ever been the first white person a kid has seen or if you were wondering what happens to criminals in small towns in Guatemala.

Aldea Nimasac: population 6,591, elevation 2531m, 6.5 km from Totonicapán.

This is where I live. Well for now. As a roaming Kiva fellow, I get to work with multiple organizations here in Guatemala.  The first, in the capital, and the second here in Aldea Nimasac. The closest big town is… well small.  At least by my standards. I am used to Camarillo: which I consider a suburb of Los Angeles with over 600,000 people, not a suburb of a town of 50,000 with suburbs of less than 10,000 people.  Add some zeros….

Over the weekend, I trekked down to Totonicapán to pick up a sweater: yes, at 2500m, it is cold here, and the clothes I brought (an old sweatshirt, a long sleeve tee and a very thin shell) just don´t cut it. As I walked through town, I stopped every half a block at these second-hand clothing stores. Asking if they had sweaters or jackets in my size.  The store owner´s eyes traced my feet up to my head. They would laugh. No, we don´t have anything. Then, when I would ask about the biggest size they had, they would pull out a used, small A&F  sweatshirt. Does this fit? After the first store, I wouldn´t even humor them by trying it on.

I finally stumbled on a used clothing store and went through the same dialogue. But as I was browsing the racks, I found a large Eddie Bauer sweater. Yes, a little small, but this would do. I wondered what part of the U.S. it came from, and at 10Q ($1.25) I knew it had to have been donated to down here. In the U.S., I clean out my closet only to repurchase it six months later down south.  At least I didn´t have to pay to get it shipped? A whole industry based off the things we Americans no longer find useful.

Passing through the market, I stopped at a stall to buy some bread and papaya.  As I was paying, I felt something on my arm. A four year-old boy poking me. Seconds later, he had his foot pressed up against mine and his finger in his mouth looking down at his foot. He smiled and laughed. Am I really that big? As I walk through the town, the kids whisper gigante as I pass. I smile and say Adios–the standard greeting here–unsure of what else to do.

On a separate thread, as I was walking through the town to play soccer with the guy I am staying with, I mentioned how I got robbed in the capital. He grinned, and said I should have been here.  There are no thieves because they kill them. He corrected himself, well in the next village the neighborhood watch kills them. Here, when they catch one, they drag them through the town with a loudspeaker saying come look at the criminal.  When they finally get to the community center (an elementary school) they strip them naked and tie ropes and boulders to their body and make them haul them back through the town. He said, “the police never do anything…so we do”.

And because of this, the thieves flee or never rob again.  So, yes, mom, I feel very, very safe here. Now, I can walk around, and hike and not really worry about anything!

Not all who wander are lost…

August 24, 2010 at 3:10 pm | Posted in Aldea Nimasac, Cuisine, Guatemala, Lago Atitlan, Mountains, Travel | 5 Comments
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Read this if you enjoy ranchera versions of Hotel California, if you like climbing volcanoes at 5am, or jumping off climbs into ancient Mayan lakes. Or read it for the secret location of the best burrito place in Guatemala or perhaps if buried somewhere deep inside you too have a sense of adventure and a little bit of energy.

A sense of adventure and a little bit of energy. That’s all lonely planet listed under the prerequisites to climb Volcano San Pedro, one of the three that rises up from Lago Atitlan. Somehow, I doubted that was all it took as the lake sits at a little under 1600m and the cumber, the top of the volcano is buried by a heavy cloud layer at 3020m. But, after three weeks of smog, and Guate City, I was ready to get out. And an invitation from Tommy, a friend I meet last weekend at the beach, to get some fresh air helped to seal the deal.

The trip worked out well into my workplan. This morning I had to be in Aldea Nimasac to start working to implement the Cerise Questionnaire (a questionnaire that works to measure the social performance of microfinance institutions) with Asociación ASDIR, another microfinance organization in Guatemala. And Aldea Nimasac is a part of Totonicapan which lies an hour away from Quetzaltenago (nickname Xela): so I caught a ride with the executive director of FAPE´s family to Xela on Friday, and made my way to the Lago Atitlan from Xela with Tommy early Saturday morning.

We got to Panajachel, the largest town on Lago Atitlan, (by the way, I was originally going to name this post something along the lines of traveling to places I can´t pronounce but decided to go with the Tolkien quote to reflect my journey as a wandering Kiva fellow) on Saturday and immediately made our way over to San Pedro which lies at the base of the Volcano. We took another lancha (small transport boats on the lake) to San Marcos—home to more foreign hippies than Guatemaltecos, and make our way to some cliffs that Tommy discovered the last time he was there.

We hiked past half a dozen long-term meditation centers and yoga places and finally got to the cliffs rising a good 12m out of the lake (for all us Americans a good 35ft). And jumped off into the warm waters of Lago Atitlan.

On the way back, we stopped at Moonfish for some burritos. Possibly the freshest, tastiest burritos in Guatemala (perhaps California as well). I had a falafel burrito (don´t laugh there is a huge Israeli community around the lake) with homemade salsa, super fresh veggies, homemade tortillas and the best falafel I have ever had (yes, better than Israel). All with the best cup of coffee I have had since Colombia: the coffee plants grew out back and they did all the drying and roasting of the beans on site! French pressed for maximum deliciousness. Needless to say, we returned the next day for some breakfast burritos and nachos—that for sure would have topped Lily´s in Malibu if they had bacon.

Fast forward to 5am. I dragged myself out of bed and threw on my Merrills. We still couldn´t see the top of the Volcano San Pedro, but having located the trailhead on Saturday, we grabbed our headlamps and made our way through sleepy San Pedro to begin our ascent. At the trailhead two natives stamped our hands and made us aware that it was 100Q a piece to climb the mountain with a guide. “And without one?” we asked. “The same.” I panicked I brought only 50Q for a meal after, but Tommy thankfully had enough. I thought they were going to send us the 300m down to the town to get the money if we didn´t have it.

I´ll let the videos tell the story of the climb as I was a little too out of breath to say much. 1400m is a way to climb and most of the time it was stairs straight up. The climb was even a bit harder because I was coming from Guate City. Thankfully, we had homemade banana and chocolate bread that we bought in town for around a dollar waiting to be consumed at the top.

And now, I´m here in ASDIR. Over the weekend, the combination of the climate change and being around some people with the flu caused me to be a little under the weather today, but I´m hoping it gets knocked out by some good sleep and some delicious caldo de res a little later today.

Until next time, your wandering Kiva Fellow.

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