Cuzco Ruins Travel Guide

December 23, 2010 at 6:03 pm | Posted in Culture, Cuzco, Mountains, Peru, Travel | 1 Comment
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This is the best information you are going to get on the ruins around Cuzco.  Which ones you can get in for free, which ones are the best.  Here, I´m evaluating Tipón, Pikillacta, Moray, Chinchero, and Q´enqo.

So, this past week Marc Capule came to visit.  Being a shoestring traveler like myself with a strong adversion to paying the gringo tax that Cuzco imposes, we decided to try to get into as many ruins as we could for free.  To prove my point, we walked into a bookstore to find him a notebook, and when the lady behind the counter said 80; he assumed it was 80 soles ($40) and said, “Ok, I don´t need it that badly” and started to leave. Soon everything got sorted out (the notebook was 80 cents), and we started a week of awesome food (will be in a following post) and touring around Cuzco.

 

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Tipón is my favorite ruin so far.  To get there, take a cab to the Urcos taxi stop on Av. La Cultura in front of the Universidad.  Get off at Tipón.  Cabs cost S./10 a person and another S./10 to get in.  Alternatively, walk down the road 4 km.  When you get to the base of the hill, don´t go up the pedestrian steps, but walk up the road past the giant Tipón sign.  About 20m up the road, there is a small path leading up the ancient Incan steps to the ruins (and bypassing the control).  Tipón is a beautiful series of terraces interspersed with canals.  You can walk up the Incan steps in the wall (generally rocks sticking out of the wall) to climb the terraces to the natural spring at the back of the ruins. Or alternatively, check out the view from the fortess that you passed coming up the Incan steps.

Pikillacta. Similarly to get here, you take the taxi from the Urcos stop, and get off at Pikillacta.  The only cool part of the ruin is the giant wall alongside the road and views of the lake. (see slideshow). Sneaking in to the main ruin is easy.  From the road, take “the high road” instead of walking down the path to control.  The path leads you past control directly to the ancient city.  Now, merely crumbling rock walls. Place this at the bottom of your list.

Moray. I thought (and had been told) this was one of the closest ruins in the Sacred Valley.  My verdict, go to Tipón first.  It´s better maintained, greener, and with the natural spring, more beautiful. To get here, take the bus to Urubamba from Pavitos street in Cuzco.  Get off Moray.  Your options of getting to the ruin are limited (they are 14km away).  The cab runs S./15 each way.  Alternatively, you can do a bike ride to the ruins.  The circular terraces were used for crop rotation (each terrace differed by .5º C so they were experimenting with temperature differences) and the larger one as an amphitheater.  The cab will drop you off at the control, but a dirt path leading down to Urubamba suggests that you could sneak in from the valley.  There is a nice hike from Las Salineras to Urubamba (another S./15 to get there).

Chinchero. Second favorite ruin in this list. Take the bus/ convey/ taxi from Pavitos street in Cuzco.  Get off at Chinchero.  From the big sign that talks about the ruins, walk up until you see the plaza on your left. Walk through the plaza, and take the street up that is closest to Urubamba (away from Cuzco).  Although there are three controls in the city, going up the left hand side (if you are facing the ruins) lets you avoid all three.  The ruins, the church, and the market are all worth checking out.

Finally, Q´enqo. These ruins are a short trip from Cuzco and a lovely afternoon hike.  Walk up through San Blas until you hit the road going to Sacsayhuaman.  On the road should be a small sign for rock climbing.  If you cross the small creek and follow the path up, you reach the Moon Temple (when you get there, make sure you go into the caves).  For Q´enqo climb the hills on the other side of the creek until you pass a massive Inca stone wall. You can reach Q´enqo from the backside by crossing the bridge.

Happy Travels! Cuzco Restaurant and the Rest of the Sacred Valley Ruins Soon!

For all the Skeptics

October 12, 2010 at 4:39 pm | Posted in Beach, El Salvador, Guatemala, Kiva, Microfinance, Surfing, Travel | 1 Comment
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This weekend, I went to El Tunco, El Salvador with a couple of Kiva Fellows for a few days of surf, sand, fish tacos, flat julie filming (the new Kiva Fellows class intro video), smoothies, more fish tacos, and apparently a barrage of questions from some of the most unconvinced, microfinance skeptics I have met traveling.

Now, obviously I will have a tendency to defend microfinance as an industry because it is what I´m doing right now. More than that, its something I believe does a lot of good for a lot of people (maybe not everyone, but a lot of people), and even more than that, I am doing it voluntarily–so yes, I believe in microfinance. But as we sat in hammocks talking to our fellow travelers, we got hit with  a ton of skepticism of the industry (a lot of which I would like to clarify and respond to).

I mentioned that the typical Guatemalan moneylender charges 10% a month, and their immediate response was what you charge 9%? (for the sake of simplicity, I will response from my microfinance institutions (mfi) point of view and not Kiva´s). There are two things that are implied by this question: one, that the majority of mfis are seeking to maximize profit, and two, that the marginal benefit that mfis provide is well, non-existent. Uninformed on both counts. My mfi charges 3% monthly interest which is significantly lower than the moneylenders and in line with microfinance competition in the area. Contrary to popular belief, most mfis are not for profit (if you would like to discuss SKS´s IPO we can talk one on one), my current mfi included.  The majority have a social mission of expanding their clients access to credit and other basic services and generally to alleviate poverty.  In this sense, a 3% monthly credit coupled with other services (see my last three Kiva fellow blogs) doesn´t just provide marginal value to their clients, but adds significant value. Let´s also not insult the client´s intelligence, they would know if they were being taken for a ride, and contract microfinance services because they want too and because the services provided have a higher value for them then their other options.

That´s still a high annualized interest rate. Yes, I agree. It is high, but in order to administer the loans, it is significantly more expensive than going to chase.com and signing up for a mortgage or a credit card. Loan officers met and vet each client individually and then have to collect repayments and follow-up on the loan.  The fact of the matter is that microfinance is correcting a market failure (to provide credit to the poor) and at first, correcting this market failure costs more money.  Like I mentioned before, most microfinance organizations are not profit seeking and because of their social missions, some have even lowered their interest rates over time. As the market failure is corrected, more competition will be introduced, and the markets will become more efficient.

Not everyone is an entrepreneur, so whats the point? Does it do anything for the person that gets a loan to provide the same service as another ten people in the town? First of all, Yunus would disagree with this: everyone is an entrepreneur he would say.  But I understand the criticism.  Through microfinance, are we just enabling the clients to provide services that already exist? I would say that most businesses started with a microfinance loan aren´t unique: you will see 12 Kiva loans for corner stores, another 20 for tailors, and 15 more for pig farmers, but the fact of the matter is that they have access to financial services (and hopefully other services through the mfi) that they didn´t have before.  So, although we can´t specifically say that microfinance has improved the lives of its participants (although it is irrefutable that it has improved the lives of some), we can say that providing access to financial services is a step in the right direction to alleviating poverty.

So, for all the skeptics, microfinance isn´t perfect, but until you find something more effective, I´m going to keep working with this system knowing that it is doing a lot more good than harm.

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